Thailand As It Once Was – KOH KOOD

koh kood

 

Although I’m of a free and adventurous spirit always seeking new thrills, something keeps bringing me back to this unique and beautiful country.

The people, the positive energy and the freedom – this will always welcome you in the land of a thousand smiles.

This time the decision was to visit eastern Thailand, the part which has, fortunately, not yet felt the effects of mass tourism. Of the four islands we visited on this trip, the final one, as a cherry on our sundae, was the unforgettable Koh Kood (Ko Kut).

Located more southerly from the much better known islands of Chang and Maak, along the border with Cambodia,

Koh Kood is a mountain island covered by a fascinating jungle. Its western and southern sides hide one of the most beautiful sand beaches I have seen on any of my travels through the kingdom. That’s why the island proudly and rightfully bears the moniker of the “Maldives of Thailand”.

The island has about a thousand inhabitants, making it only a seasonal destination. It is connected with a road built a few years back, and thus comfortable and safe to drive on. From the main road, side dirt roads will take you to beautiful coves with long paradise beaches stretched along, replete with vegetation, white sand, and crystal clear water. Some of my favorites are definitely:  Bang Bao, Ao Ta Khian, Ao Phrao and Ao Noi. The beaches are not crowded, and if you’re lucky (like we were), you can be completely alone and swim in the nude.

Some of my favorites are definitely:  Bang Bao, Ao Ta Khian, Ao Phrao and Ao Noi. The beaches are not crowded, and if you’re lucky (like we were), you can be completely alone and swim in the nude.

As there is no public transport on the island, the best way to explore and discover all of its wonders is to hire a scooter, which will set you back 250 baht (6.5 euro) a day.

Kood is definitely not a budget destination with 300-baht accommodation. If you want to be accommodated at the very beach, you will have to pay upwards of 1300 baht, but I still maintain that these beaches are worth every single baht. Along the main road you’ll come across mini markets, fruit stands and restaurants managed by the locals, where you’ll pay between 50 and 80 baht (1.5-2 euro) for a nice, ample traditional meal.  

In addition to beaches, the island also abounds in waterfalls,

seven of them in total. The best known is Klong (waterfall) Chao, located in the central part of the island. If you are an adventure aficionado, you can take a jungle route and walk to the 500-year-old trees.

The fishing villages of Ao Yai and Ao Salad are a special attraction of Koh Kood. Built on water, these villages offer a true experience of the life of fishermen’s families. Sit comfortably in one of the numerous restaurants and savor the delicacies prepared from freshly caught fish and seafood at excellent prices.

If you like peace and intact nature, instead of the much-touted Thai destinations which have lost the battle with mass tourism, this is the place for you.

Koh Kood is Thailand as it once was.

We will definitely go back!